aftermath

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Alpacalypse!!

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alpacalypseI’ve now got 4 of the most charming bookmarks ever! Alpacas!! Thank you, SuziQ!

Off they go romping into 2017 to reignite some of the reading that has been pushed too far aside the past 3 months —

  • Alice, one of my twins, dances off into my Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas R. Hofstadter.
  • Alison, my other twin, grazes for but a moment in Petrarch’s Songbook a verse translation by James Wyatt Cook. She gets easily distracted and can be found prancing most anywhere.
  • Albert, the eldest, plays in Auto-Da-Fé, by Elias Canetti, translated by C.V. Wedgwood.
  • Alan, the baby of the herd, finds her fun in Democracy: Stories from the Long Road to Freedom, by Condoleezza Rice.
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Written by macheide

30 December 2017 at 12:21 pm

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philobibliologue

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1563I have finished reading Undine, a notable fairy tale by Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué, my own copy being one included within Famous Stories Every Child Should Know, edited by Hamilton Wright Mabie. Undine comes “recommended” by Little Women‘s Jo, it being one she wished to get for Christmas, and it adds a certain charm to think of reading it to her. Thanks, Jo.

In my current reading of Little Women itself, I’ve just passed through the chapters following the letters sent to Mother in Washington, among which Beth’s foresaw the pending shadows, writing “I can’t sing ‘LAND OF THE LEAL’ now, it makes me cry.” Which reminds me of hearing the song during a certain fateful drive home from Nashville that I had about four years ago. Which these days has me playing a fair bit of Silly Wizard, such as —

 
Thanks, Beth.

In my current reading of A Walk through the Dark, I’m up to chapter 20, about halfway through. Eva Piper has just been describing how keeping a personal journal helped her through some of the most difficult times of her caregiving for her husband Don. Me, I’m now rather partial to WordPress, although I too have fill many a handwritten journal through the years. But yes, I quite agree: journaling is a powerful friend. Thanks, Eva.

Having a soft spot for the sestina, my poetry reading for the day has picked up a few gleaned from the pages of the poetry books I received this Christmas —

Thanks, Sara.

Meanwhile, I’m continuing to make progress through Finnegans Wake and Tarantula. Thanks, James. And thanks, Bob.

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Written by macheide

27 December 2015 at 7:58 am

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Villanelle Lover

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2015-08-04 19.24.00

The key to a good villanelle is to come up with two lines that are genuinely attracted to each other but also wholly independent of each other, so that their final coupling will feel both inevitable and surprising.

Annie Finch, in introduction to Villanelles

I smiled when I read that. And before reading further, I paused to launch this blog post.

I thought of how I’ve heard it said that a good villanelle is like a great romance. So as I transcribed Finch’s words, I heard her sentence in my head with substitutions for two words: “The key to a good romance is to come up with two lovers that are genuinely attracted to each other but also wholly independent of each other, so that their final coupling will feel both inevitable and surprising.”

Romancing the Villanelle . . .

Written by macheide

4 August 2015 at 8:12 pm

Stretch Far Away

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ShelleyAlmost exactly 50 years ago, I memorized my first serious poem. More than likely, I’d earlier learned the words of many a childhood poem. But the first serious poem I recited from memory was a classic sonnet (yes, Turco, it is one) by one of our classic poets: Ozymandias, by Percy Bysshe Shelley. By now I can’t even recall where I was able to dig that poem up back then — perhaps one of my father’s books, although he was partial to Robert Browning; possibly a book from our school, although I recall only our high schools having libraries. Wherever I managed to find it, memorizing Ozymandias represented a threshold for me: crossing that threshold was when I became a lover of poetry. And now, less than 3 years shy of the 200th anniversary of the initial publication of Ozymandias, my poetry bookshelves finally gain a volume of Shelley poetry.

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Written by macheide

15 April 2015 at 6:30 pm

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Practically Up There

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The Practical AstronomerSince two full moons ago, only one night in seven has been clear enough for us to see the moon. Yet I always know where the moon is relative to the sun and the stars and our horizons, and I always know whether our moon ascends or descends and when it stands still and when it crosses over, and I always know whether it has come closer to us or is farther away, and I don’t need to see it to know. Even so, the moon is always a welcome sight, even when it is so close and full that its light makes nearby stars as invisible as on a cloudy night.

And since Jupiter went retrograde back in early December, we’ve had little opportunity to watch the majestic giant back away from Regulus. Yet from the rare evening clear enough to catch the planet rising to the morning clear enough to watch it fade to the sunrise, I can tell the hour of day by its path across our winter night, and I can tell how far we’ve gone into the season by how far the planet leads Leo. Still, Jupiter is always beautiful to witness so bright overhead, and this winter on clear nights it has become the first wanderer I turn to see.

And we’ve had mostly clouds and rain through the past dozen cycles of Algol. Yet as easily as knowing dawn and dusk I can tell when the demon winks, and I know where Medusa’s head floats even during winter’s daytime when it crosses over the other side of our earth, and I know it’s a glimpse of Algol I’m catching even if it’s the only star peeking through a passing break in our clouds. Nevertheless I love having skies open enough to trace the path I love to trace from Saiph through Bellatrix all the way over to Cassiopeia, then back to this fave.

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Written by macheide

13 January 2015 at 6:12 am

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Up Close and Intimate

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An Intimate Look at the Night SkyLike a love that never grows distant life after life after life, but grows only closer, more and more intimate, so is my friendship with the stars.

And like one can never study too many math books, like one can never lose oneself in too many chess books, like one can never fly too far on too many poetry books, likewise I can never have too many books about the skies around me. So yet another book purchased with the Christmas gift card given to me by Natalie: An Intimate Look at the Night Sky, by Chet Raymo.

When flipping through it while at the bookstore, what persuaded me to add it to my shelves: finding myself reading more than a few pages into Chapter 2 — “Dark: Why the Night Is Dark.” Start a discussion of darkness with a fave poem by Yeats and quickly hit escape velocity from there, and I’m caught as easily as a particle veering too close to the event horizon of a black hole.

Thank you again, Nat, for a Christmas gift that will last in my heart as long as the stars.

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Aftermath Afterlife:

 
 
 
 

Written by macheide

12 January 2015 at 6:16 am

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Sonnets Honestly Made

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The Making of a SonnetBecause she was adept at formal verse, a friend once had her poetry scorned as “less honest” than that of someone with no discipline at all to his scribbling. Her talent with sonnets was specifically targeted for unkind mocking. As for me, I always liked how she compared the fourteen lines of a sonnet to the natural cycles of the waxing and waning moon, the patterns of rhyme to the symmetry in a flower, the volta to the turning of the wind. Seriously, can anyone so crudely reject the sonnet, except by being ignorant to the making of a sonnet, let alone the true making of any art?

As many hundreds of sonnets as I already have in my private poetry library, and as many thousands as I have available through my local library, and as many tens of thousands as are available online, I still gladly welcome to my home shelves this new volume, courtesy of the gift card I received from Natalie for Christmas: The Making of a Sonnet, edited by Edward Hirsch and Eavan Boland.

Thank you, Nat, for the Christmas gift. Although I myself don’t write sonnets, I have always appreciated the honesty in a good sonnet. This book will be read many times cover to cover.

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Aftermath Afterlife:

 
 
 
 

Written by macheide

9 January 2015 at 5:41 am

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