aftermath

we dream, we create, we change, we love

Possibly a Renouncement

with one comment

Starting with this post, I will no longer waste my time with WordPress tags. Instead, I’m going to have to waste precious time going back through all my past posts to remove tags that WordPress has rendered useless.

Which might be the beginning of the complete end of WordPress for me. I suppose I could always go with using the software on a host of my own; but if I ever get back to that point, I swear I’m going to just “roll my own,” the way I used to a decade ago.

WordPress has recently made a change that commits three of the worst of the cardinal sins:

  1. Development” that Takes Away More than It Gives. Whatever search engine is being used for WordPress’ unwanted “possibly related posts” hitchhikers is one of the worst I’ve seen, infinitely worse than even some of the hilarious ads Google reckons have some similarity to a g-mail. In particular, whatever process is being used by WordPress is shockingly less adept than the WordPress tags themselves are. Those hitchhikers are not part of any of my blog posts – place an innocuous sidebar or some other widget that gives any reader the option to move away from my post to find these stupid brainless unrelated posts, and at least I wouldn’t feel like WordPress has just set graffitti hoodlooms loose on my blog. (For instance, see WordPress’ reverse development has made the “Posted in X” links on each one of my posts just as useless, since those links were already making the blunder of mixing up categories versus tags – but at least you have to click on that link away from my own blog to see WordPress’ ineptitude, versus papering up my own blog’s wall with it.) But then WordPress gives us the option to turn the idiocy off? Not really, not when they do it at the expense of making all our WordPress tags worthless. So this is extortion, plain and simple: accept nonsense WordPress graffitti on your blog, or else they won’t acknowledge the wisdom of the writer’s own blog tags. If I thought their programming skills as weak as opendiary’s were, I might just figure they don’t know well enough how to separate out two completely different concepts that ought to have two completely independent subroutines. Instead, I think they’re more like LiveJournal, simply out of touch with what makes good market sense. So without even the proverbial one step forward, WordPress takes two giant steps back. Keep that up, and your destination becomes rather inevitable.
  2. Poor Design – Inappropriate Interdependence of Disparate Features. Search is different from categories, which are both different from tags. Each can be used to achieve separate goals, and each should be handled separately and independently by the software. WordPress fails to understand this, blurring the lines so badly and tangling all of the wires up so much that they maybe ought just give up and call it all the same thing and forget trying to give users the full capability that the different capabilities might have offered with any reasonably adept programming support.
  3. Reversal of a Previously Working Feature. Not only that, but even my WordPress tags that used to work no longer do, not unless I submit to the extortion of accepting ugly stupidity to be tacked onto my posts. Purist that I am, I don’t like the idea of meaningless tags on my posts; so now I’ll be occupying myself going back through every single one of my past posts and removing the tags for which WordPress has now seen fit to unilaterally change its policy. When I write something today, I prefer knowing it will look, smell, and act the same tomorrow. Neither opendiary nor LiveJournal have that level of very basic respect for its users; and WordPress seems oblivious to the need to find it. What next, WordPress? What am I writing now that I’m going to have to revisit to fix tomorrow, because of another reversal that eliminates or wrecks something that used to work?

OpenDiary and LiveJournal have spent years perfecting those same cardinal sins. And into the same ditch those sins sent OpenDiary, already is headed LiveJournal. Keep committing them here, and WordPress will follow the others down. I know, I’m only one little-known writer of no consequence, but pitifully poor market sense has but one inevitable result. And not to make too much of one “little” change, but the kind of thinking represented by this WordPress modification is as good a sign of blogcancer as one might expect to find.

At least I put enough time in testing this before making the mistake of paying for it. I’d be downright pissed if I’d paid for the privilege of having my past work messed around with like this.

Bumper Sticker [www.internetbumperstickers.com/] - reprobate

Written by macheide

9 May 2008 at 9:09 am

Posted in reprobate

One Response

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  1. Appears that WordPress may have fixed this – By all appearances, now it seems that a user can turn off the annoying, brainless supposedly-context-sensitive unwanted hitchhikers, yet still have our own tags work properly.

    Then again, who knows? I am guessing this only by how things seem to now be operating quite differently now than they were several days ago.

    Would it be too much to ask for WordPress to document any of this for us, so we’re not just guessing?

    I’m not exactly inclined to go overboard re-installing all of my own tags until I know if this latest change is just a happy accident or not; and whether or not we can expect to still see it around tomorrow, or whether WordPress’ next ill-conceived whim will steal it away again.

    macheide

    12 May 2008 at 5:48 pm


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